Search Results for: universal targeted

New evidence suggests universal pre-K increases overall pre-K enrollment for all income groups, but provides mixed evidence on test score effects

A new paper by Elizabeth Cascio and Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach provides important new evidence on the effects of universal pre-K. This paper was presented in late September at the Brookings Panel on Economic Activity. Cascio and Schanzenbach examine the effects … Continue reading

Posted in Distribution of benefits, Early childhood program design issues, Early childhood programs, Timing of benefits

Moving the U.S. towards a more universal, high-quality early education system

Lane Kenworthy, a well-known comparative sociologist of inequality issues at the University of Arizona, has a thought-provoking blog post on why the U.S. should more towards a high-quality early education system. Based on his own extensive knowledge of Scandinavian social … Continue reading

Posted in Early childhood program design issues, Early childhood programs, Economic development

What does the Fitzpatrick study of Georgia’s “universal” pre-K program show?

During the current debate over expanding pre-K, expansion opponents have sometimes cited a study by Maria Donovan Fitzpatrick of Georgia’s pre-K program. For example, on February 25, 2013, the Wall Street Journal editorial page described the conclusions of Fitzpatrick’s study … Continue reading

Posted in Early childhood programs | 3 Comments

NPR’s spin on universal preschool is unduly negative

NPR’s Morning Edition on February 18, 2013 had an interview by NPR host Linda Wertheimer with NPR science correspondent Shankar Vedantam that gave an unduly negative spin to what research shows about the effectiveness of universal preschool. The program began … Continue reading

Posted in Distribution of benefits, Early childhood program design issues, Early childhood programs | 1 Comment

Universal public services that are redistributive and productive are the key to reducing income inequality

Eduardo Porter, a reporter for the New York Times, has an excellent recent column that summarizes some of the evidence for how government can effectively have large effects in reducing income inequality. His column builds on the research of sociologist … Continue reading

Posted in Distribution of benefits, Early childhood programs

Universal pre-K and the Presidential campaign

Prominent bloggers Kevin Drum and Matt Yglesias have both linked to Dana Goldstein’s brief blog post suggesting that universal pre-K be a key issue in the Presidential campaign. Dana Goldstein advocates for high-quality universal pre-K and child care for all … Continue reading

Posted in Early childhood program design issues, Early childhood programs, National vs. state vs. local

Top 9 reasons why universal access to pre-K makes sense

I was recently asked to give some key reasons why pre-K systems with broad or even universal access make sense. Here are my top 9 reasons. Political sustainability. Systems that help income groups that comprise a majority of voters are … Continue reading

Posted in Distribution of benefits, Early childhood program design issues, Early childhood programs, Economic development | 1 Comment

Special education cost savings from pre-k programs can be higher for targeted pre-k programs, or if special education costs are higher, or if special education effects of a program are higher

In a previous post, I provided estimates of the savings in special education costs from a high-quality universal pre-k program. I stated that these cost savings started out at about 4% of the pre-k program’s costs in kindergarten. That is, … Continue reading

Posted in Early childhood programs, Local variation in benefits, Timing of benefits | 2 Comments

Increasing educational performance and reducing educational disparities is more feasible if pursued through high-productivity interventions, including but not limited to early childhood education

On May 27, 2015, the Upjohn Institute released a report on Michigan’s school finance system and how to reform it to improve student performance in Michigan, and lessen disparities among children in various income groups.  The lead author of the … Continue reading

Posted in Distribution of benefits, Early childhood program design issues, Economic development

New Duke study of special education cost savings due to North Carolina’s Smart Start and More at Four programs

A newly published study by three well known researchers at Duke (Clara Muschkin, Helen Ladd, and Ken Dodge) finds that North Carolina’s early childhood programs significantly reduce special education placements at grade 3. The programs examined are More at Four, … Continue reading

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